Miso Shoyu Ramen

So yesterday I shared a recipe for homemade ramen noodles, and today I’m sharing the ramen soup recipe! If you have ever had traditional Japanese style ramen then you will know that it tastes very different than the pre-packaged stuff you find in the store. Now, I’m not one to speak poorly about store-bought ramen – I grew up eating Shin Ramen and other spicy Korean versions and love it. But it’s a different flavor and style altogether. This ramen soup base is made with miso and shoyu. Miso is a paste made by fermenting soybeans. Shoyu, also known as soy sauce, is made from a fermented paste soybeans as well, but is a liquid. FYI-there are many other styles of soup bases for ramen.

First, you start with the homemade ramen noodles, or store bought ramen noodles.

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I prepared some toppings for the ramen: hard boiled egg and scallions.

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After boiling my noodles I put them in a bowl.

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Then I poured some broth over them and topped it all with the egg, scallions, and some chili paste.

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And of course, you have to eat them with chop sticks!

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Miso Shoyu Ramen
 
A vegetarian, and vegan optional homemade ramen recipe! Adapted from Forbidden Rice's Miso Mushroom Ramen.
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Asian, Vegan
Serves: 4
Ingredients
For the broth
  • one 4-6 inch strip of kombu seaweed, rinsed and wiped off*
  • one 4-inch chunk of ginger, peeled and minced
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ teaspoon red chili flakes
  • ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons shoyu, or soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (optional, omit if vegan)
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons mirin
  • ½ an onion, peeled and cut into large chunks
  • ½ teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons yellow miso
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 4 cups water
For the ramen
  • 8 ounces ramen noodles
  • 4 hard boiled eggs, peeled and cut in half lengthwise (optional, omit if vegan)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • chopped scallions
  • chili paste
Instructions
  1. Combine all of the listed ingredients for the broth in a large stock pot. Stir well and turn the heat on to medium-high. Once the broth comes to a simmer, reduce the heat to low. Let the broth cook for 3 to 4 hours, occasionally giving it a good stir.
  2. After the broth has cooked for at least three hours, pour it through a fine mesh strainer into another stock pot or a large bowl. Return the strained broth to the stove and bring the heat up to a simmer over medium high.
  3. Cook the noodles according to directions, then divide into four bowls.
  4. Top the noodles with ¼ of the broth, a hard boiled egg, scallions, and chili paste.
Notes
*If you cannot find the kombu or don't want to purchase it for one little piece you can omit it. It adds to the flavor but isn't a big deal if you don't use it.